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. what will the u.s. do in those countries, if anything? plus, does the united states have a responsibility to intervene in the humanitarian crisis that was this woman trashing a liquor store when she did not receive prompt attention from a clerk? we'll discuss. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. >>> american military officials are claiming initial success in isolating moammar gadhafi's regime, after a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according tocy officials, coalition strikes have crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no fly zone is in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, at least not now. one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's compound in tripoli last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown, but he has vowed to fight a quote long, drawn-out war with western forces. >>> meanwhile, the pentagon says there is so far no evidence that civilians in libya have been harmed in the conflict, although it w
report. >> it's just the beginning. >> the u.s. and allies, now seeing the effects of a full scale military operation to stop libya's leader, muammar gaddafi. >> and effectively he hasn't flown any in the last few days, i would say the no-fly zone is effectively in place. >> harris: that was 24 hours ago, and tonight, fox reports live from tripoli. what our journalists on the ground are seeing now. plus, life saving supply already running low in japan's devastation zone. now traces of radiation found in even more food sources. but a month a frantic rush to contain a nuclear disaster. >> earthquake survivors pulled from the wreckage. we're live from japan where a new day begins. we begin tonight with a heavy bombardment by coalition forces inside libya. mixed messages by muammar gaddafi who has called for a new cease-fire and promises to fight to the death at the same time. here is where we stand. the fog calling operation odyssey dawn a success and we're told the no-fly zone is now in effect and cruise missiles and long range bombers have taken out a number of key targets including
will explain to those lawmakers and to the american people his take on the u.s. military involve in the the north african nation, which began just over a week ago. white house correspondent mike emanuel is at the national defense university, the site of the speech tonight with a preview. mike? >> reporter: good evening. president obama will speak to a mostly military audience in the auditorium about why he authorized military force in libya. and where the mission goes from here. military intervention by the u.s. and allies appeared to have shifted momentum in favor of the rebels who fought their way to muammar gaddafi's hometown of sirte. >> clearly, the opposition is not well-organized and it's not a very robust organization. that is obvious. so any gain that they make is tenuous based on that. >> reporter: in a town hall on univision simulcast in spanish, president obama reiterated about libya. >> our involvement is there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: over the weekend, mr. obama explained why he believed military action was necessary. >> i firm
the american people tonight to explain the u.s. mission in libya. the reasoning behind it. the u.s. military's role, and are we go from here. all this comes on the heels of a significant, rather, a dramatic victory for the administration with nato agreeing yesterday to take command of the mission including the ground attack. that as international airstrikes continue for the 9th night over the nation. libya state tv broadcast these images from a southern city of sabha claiming the attacks were against civilians. top nato commander today hitting back against suggestions that nato forces are essentially providing air cover for the rebels. >> our goal, our goal, it is to help protect civilians and population centers from attack or that are the threat of an attack. >>shepard: the in six not to take sides but we have. the opposition is benefiting, before the no-fly zone they were in trouble but this has weakened the military. and now the two sides are fighting on equal terms because of us and they are closing in on muammar qaddafi's hometown, a key government stronghold on the road to tripoli. and
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. gets ready to hand off the mission in libya, after president obama makes his case to the nation, that military intervention was necessary. >>> from california, a sliding hillside puts homes in danger. families told to get out before their houses tumbled down. >>> and the drastic measures taken by one teen who wanted a new car. wait until you hear what she did to get it. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. president obama takes his case for military action against libya on the road today. it will be part of a major speech that mr. obama gives later today. >> right here in new york. >> and last night, the president spoke to the nation to defend his choices and also to announce that nato will take over the lead role tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us from washington with all the details. good morning, emily. >> reporter: peggy and rob, good morning to you. before president obama used the word libya last night, he said the words international effort. and he said the world had had a responsibility to a
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
we think this is going to be? can they make up for these losses? >> u.s. investors are rattled. coach shares are down 8%, but if you look at the long-term outlook, it looks a little better for these retailers. it's going to take a few months, but japanese contention there will eventually rebound, and what they're doing right now is pushing hard into china trying to grow their businesses. also here in the u.s., we see the demand for luxury goods improving that's rebounding with the economic recovery here in the u.s. suzanne? >> all right, allison, thank you. appreciate it. >>> we want to go beyond the headlines now on the recovery of those two airmen after their fighter jet crashed in libya. we're learning more about how the chain of events played out. u.n. forces rescued the pilot and libyans found the weapons officer. >> i am speaking with him and i kiss him and i tell him you are coming for us. you are our brothers. so don't be afraid. you will be safe. we will carry you anyplace you want. >> for more details on the crash and the recovery, i want to bring in our pentagon corresponde
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
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stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
there are big changes there, according to u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton today. she's been speaking at this emergency summit, conference of world leaders, all asking each other the same thing, that being what to do about moammar gadhafi. we're going to take you live to london in just a minute. they're also talking about the possibility that gadhafi could go into exile. but that, of course, opens up all kinds of questions as to where and who might be willing to take him. >>> first i want to go to senior international correspondent nic robertson live in tripoli. nic, before we talk about your trip to misrata, we've heard about large explosions where you are in tripoli just a short time ago. where were they? what did you hear? >> reporter: well, they were a couple of miles away from us. it's not possible to say what the target was. one of the three explosions was perhaps one of the loudest we've heard so far. and they all came within a minute of each other. what makes these explosions different from all the ones we've heard until now over the past week and a half, these came in dayligh
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
interview with former secretary of state, madeleine albright, hear what she has to say about the u.s. policy in libya. from lexus. r galld welcome to the darker side of green. see your lexus dealer. ♪ today is saturday announcer: 60 minutes of physical activity a day and eating well can help get your child healthy. get ideas. get involved. get going at letsmove.gov. that's letsmove.gov. >>> scenes from misurata, as the violence continues in this conflict. the air campaign against libya has depleted moammar gadhafi's arsenal but he is still defiant and still in power. earlier, i discussed the u.s. role with former secretary of state, madeleine albright. >> thank you very much for joining us. >> good to be with you, don. >> much has been made of this conflict and how the united states got involved. i have to ask you, do you think the president handled this properly and should we have intervened? >> i think he handled it very well. the reason we intervened is that terrible things were happening on the ground in libya. people were being killed. gadhafi himself had said that he was going to s
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
the u.s. will play the on going mission in libya. the president will give the address at national defense university. he's expected to assure americans that he can deliver on his vow that the u.s. will be a partner in the action and not in the driver's seat. head of the speech, secretary of state hillary clinton and defense secretary robert gates made the rounds on the sunday talk shows speaking on "meet the press", secretary gates may have added to the confusion about the libyan objective saying u.s. involvement in the country is not a national interest to the united states. >> secretary gates, is libya in our vital interest as a country? >> no. i don't think it's vital interest for the united states. but we clearly have interests there. and it's a part of the region which is a vital interest for the united states. >> i think a lot of people hear that and say that is striking. not in our vital interest yet we're committing military resources. >> then it wouldn't be fair to what bob said. did libya attack us? no. they did not attack us. but they were doing and gadhafi's history an
>>> a lot happening around the world right here at home, as well. let's get you caught up. the u.s. and its allies pounding libya for a third day. 120 cruise missiles and counting. is this going to help keep moammar gadhafi from attacking his own people? >>> smoke rising from a reactor. workers evacuated. and now there are new concerns about radiation in the food supply. >>> and here at home, a major cell phone merger. the number two carrier poised to become number one. what this means to you. let's get started. "american morning" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. >> it's monday, march 21st. >> it's great to see all of you this morning. we're following two stories again, but major developments from where we left off on friday. >> breaking news from japan. >> smoke spotted coming from a damaged nuclear reactor. engineers are struggling there to prevent a meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. let's get to anna coren. i understand it's now been evacuated. what's going on there? >> reporter: that's exactly right, ali. they thought they wer
outside the reactor. so high that top u.s. environmental officials report that a single dose is enough to cause hemorrhaging. more from osaka, japan. >> reporter: yes, megyn. it is looking serious now in terms of the quantity of radiation emanating from the nuclear plant. it appears that we have significant problems at reactor 2 and reactor 3. hearing there are pools of water in a trench that drains off from the reactor towards the sea. it's about 90 feet from the sea, we believe. and that's perhaps one of the reasons that we're seeing greater contamination off the shore. the information is not entirely cleaand that is because they're not sure exactly where the leak is coming from. the greatest concern is that it's coming from the container vessel, indicating, indeed, that there is a partial meltdown. the meltdown may be temporary, that hopefully they will be able to fill that container area up and keep the rods cool. because the radiation levels are so high, it's difficult for the workers to get in there. if they're able to go in without getting radiation burns, it limits what they ca
, democratic congressman dennis kucinich speaks out. he wants to ban all funding from u.s. operations in that country. we ask him why live. nuclear mistake. operators say a strike in radioactivity that prompted evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an offic
odyssey dawn to nato. the united states a huge part of nato? how much is the u.s. still on the hook? who will issue the orders? john bolton is here to go on the record. now, president obama, a few minutes ago. >> the president: gadhafi declared he would show no mercy to his own people if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte, could suffer a massacre that would have reverberated across the region and stained the conscience of the world. it was not in our national interests to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. in this particular country, libya, at this particular moment, we were faced with the prospect of violence on a horrific scale. we had a unique ability to stop that violence. international mandate for action. a coalition prepared to join us. the support of arab countries. and a plea for help from the libyan people themselves. moreover, america has an important strategic interest in preventing gadhafi from overrunning those who oppose him. a massacre would have driven thousands of additional refugees across libya's borders. putting enormous
the case for this intervention. u.s. interests have to be met if we are going to intervene. u.s. interests can't just mean validating some kind of post american theory of intervention, wherein, we wait for the arab league and the united nations to tell us thumbs up america you can go now and act and get on the -- get in the back of the bus and wait for the french to lead us. that's not inspirational. >> greta: i must confess when i heard reports that gadhafi was saying he would show no mercy to his people and compared them to rats and threatened to go door-to-door, when that was going on, it was so horrible that -- now with 20/20 hindsight, it easy for me to think why is this military action for this humanitarian purpose, when more people are dying in other parts of the world? >> that's a good question. that's the 600 million dollar a day question that is being asked now. because that's the cost incurred by americans as we support the no-fly zone. which of course the no-fly zone the intervention or enactment is turning into more than that. again, disappointing speech. because we didn't get
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
>>> good morning. presidential pressure. as moammar gadhafi continues to thumb his nose at the u.s. and its allies, striking back at libyan rebels, president obama tells cbs news it is time for gadhafi to give up the fight. >> we've got to ratchet up our diplomatic and our political pressure on him so that at some point he makes a decision to leave. >> we'll hear more from our interview with the president, and speak with former defense secretary donald rumsfeld about the u.s. mission in libya. >>> plane scary. officials discover a bullet hole in a us airways passenger jet after a flight from philadelphia to charlotte. now an investigation is under way to try to figure out just where it came from, and how serious a threat it posed to the aircraft and its passengers. >>> and fighting back. a middle school student from connecticut goes on youtube with an emotional plea for help after being bullied by her classmates for years. that video is now burning up the internet, adding to the national debate, causing quite a stir, "early" this wednesday morning, debate, causing quite a stir, "ea
150 people dead. former u.s. president jimmy carter has visited age-old american contractor in cuba. he was imprisoned for illegally providing internet access to cuban citizens. mr. carter says the authorities have made clear they did not intend to release him. now to japan, where the woes of the fukushima nuclear plant continue unabated. today, the country's nuclear safety agency said it has discovered the highest levels of radiation to date in seawater near the vicinity. -- to the facility. they acknowledged for of the six reactors at the plant will need to be scrapped. the company's process checked into a hospital with high blood pressure and dizziness. -- the company's loss check into a hospital. >> from the strip -- from the stricken plant to the sea, radiation is leaking. they don't know how or where it's coming from, but the levels are extraordinary. the government insists that contamination will be deleted as it spreads. this man is not sure. he farms seaweed 120 miles south of the plant. he's trying to salvage his nets, wrecked by the tsunami. the problems for -- the proble
addresses the nation tonight on libya. the pressure the president is under to explain the u.s. involvement. >>> also the former white house press secretary could be coming to palo alto for a new job. >>> good morning, southbound 680 traffic looks good. we'll tell you more about the morning commute and bay weather straight ahead. >>> welcome back to the morning news. president obama addresses the nation tonight. he will offer details on the u.s. military actions in libya. scott mcfarland is live. good morning, scott. >> reporter: the parking light speech take place one -- the president's speech take place one day after nato takes action. it also comes after rebel forces make huge advantages. moving closer to moammar gadhafi's hometown. there is a belief the air strikes including the u.s. air strikes have weaken gadhafi's forces. nato taking control of other things the no fly zone over libya. it's believed the president will emphasize nato's role and tell americans no u.s. ground forces will be deployed in libya. >> americans are confused as to exactly what our policy is because on the one h
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
and 19 miles to evacuate. you remember the u.s. evacuation zone is 50 miles away from the fukushima plant. now they are expanding it to get closer to where we are on this. so far the evacuation is voluntary, it could become mandatory if the conditions get worse. as we mentioned at the top of this hour there are fears that there could be a genuine breach in one of those nuclear reactors. as soon as we get more on that we will bring it right to you. and this week america's top prosecutor attorney general eric holder met with police chiefs to discuss the rising danger to police across this country. according to the latest statistics 50 enforcement officers were killed in the line of duty through march 24th of this year. that come mayor with 45 in the same period of 2010. this has been on the rise. there is a new push to protect those who work so hard and put their lives on the line to protect us. doug mckelway is live with more on this. good afternoon, doug. >> reporter: good afternoon, martha. what is most disturbing about that it is occurring at a time when violent crime and murder is gene
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
taking place there, then briefings that took place earlier today with the u.s. ambassador to libya. and white house press secretary carney announced that president obama will deliver a speech soon on libya and the region. and finally, more from french president sarkozy. but first, today's vote in the canadian house of commons, opposition members toppled prime minister stephen harper 166-145. we'll show you the vote and the comments of the prime minister and opposition leader, it's about an hour and a half. >> you're looking at a live shot on parliament hill. everyone on the inside is not as stately and calm as it is on the inside. they're waiting for a historic nonconfidence vote on an issue of contempt. that will make history. you're watching a special live edition of showdown in parliament. i want to welcome our viewers on the main network in saskatchewan and alberta. welcome to this unfolding story about our country and as we head toward an election, it will all hinge on what you're about to see in the matter of minutes ahead. we're waiting for the speaker of the house, peter mi
that the u.s. intervened to prevent the slaughter of civilians. before we show you more of what he had to say let's go rapid fire around the table. pat buchanan, five seconds or less, how would you characterize the president's speech? >> left more questions open than answered. >> donny deutsche? >> i thought it was fantastic. >> of course you did. >> he looked like a leader and showed power of track cattle. >> i think it was solid. and holes in others. >> i still don't get his attempts to explain it why we don't go into syria again and another country. >> that was the question left unanswered. speaking in washington last night the president insisted not taking action would have been a betrayal of who we are as americans. >> if we waited one more day, benghazi, a city nearly the size of charlotte,ed the conscience the world. it was not in our national interest to let that happen. i refused to let that happen. >> he ruled out targeting moammar gadhafi. warning that trying to oust him militarily would be a mistake as costly as the war in iraq. >> if we tried to overthrow gadhafi by force, our co
that the u.s. should establish a no-fly zone over libya. >> what would you do about libya? >> exercise a no-fly zone this evening. communicate to the libyan military that gadhafi was gone. and that the sooner they switch sides, the more likely they were to survive. provide help to the rebels to replace him. this this is a moment to get rid of him, do it, get it over with. the united states doesn't need anybody's permission. >> do you think moammar gadhafi has to go as a result of intervention. >> i would not have intervened. i think there are allies in the region that we could have worked with. i would not have used american and european forces. >> all right. >> wait, wait, wait. i don't understand that. hold on. >> he says on his facebook page that the two statements are not a contradiction. believe that. and that the bottom line is that he wishes the u.s. military hadn't gotten involved militarily. >> let's go to ouring inning nh desk at 30 rock. mikey, in that first clip with greta -- >> come on, mike. >> he did not talk about throwing the kitchen sink at gadhafi. everything else was th
gadhafi's hometown. president obama prepares to explain his decision to involve the u.s. military in libya during an address to the nation tonight. >>> in a disturbing case, the 55 billionaire air to the s.c. johnson fortune charged with sexually abusing a child for years. the alleged victim, his now 15-year-old stepdaughter. >>> and princely party. harry threw his brother a bachelor party over the weekend but a hitch in the plans forced a last-minute change. we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal wedding today, march 28, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. nice to be back. >> it's been a while. >> it has. i went to london to vicsit the queen. she wouldn't answer the door though. but president obama is going to face criticism. membe members of both parties have expressed concerns about the goal of the mission and how long our forces will be in libya. we'll have more straight ahead. >> also, did
making the case there's too much hungner the u.s. and it's government's responsibility to help. they're also making visits to capitol hill urging members of congress to find other areas to cut and continue food assistance to the poor. >> i know jim wallace. we were speaking at a hunger strike. we're going to talk to him tomorrow about what he's doing. jessica, thank you very much. >>> a lot of you have been tweeting me about the weather. you in florida, severe weather. slamming florida right now. take a look at the very colorful radar. we'll have pictures with the latest damage next. but first, want to go to stephanie elam with some freel money advice. >> time now for the help desk where we get answers to your financial questions. with me right now, donna rosato and lynn net cox is a writer. thank you for being with us. our first question from jeff in michigan. he writes i'm underwater on my home but no one will help me because i'm unemployed. i have paid my mortgage on time but told i could get help if i stop. what should i do? we hear this so often. >> it's never a good idea to sto
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
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